Stand-Mixer #1 Cheese Biscuits

Stand-Mixer Made Cheese Biscuits Cooling

Stand-Mix­er Made Cheese Bis­cuits Cool­ing

I will write a sep­a­rate arti­cle with my thoughts on my Stand-Mix­er and Stand-Mix­ers in gen­er­al, but right now I’m quite excit­ed to write a few short arti­cles about the won­der­ful things I’ve made with the Stand-Mix­er; the very first of which are Cheese Bis­cuits.

I got my Stand-Mix­er for Christ­mas and we cel­e­brat­ed Christ­mas on Christ­mas Eve (due to sched­ul­ing con­flicts of the fam­i­ly). This meant I was at home on Christ­mas Day with my new Stand-Mix­er and I had no yeast (why would I have yeast — it’s per­ish­able and I had not here-to-fore been bak­ing). I choose bis­cuits as my first project because I had all the ingre­di­ents (and the stores were most def­i­nite­ly closed).

Cheese Buscuits with Sausage Provincial

Cheese Bus­cuits with Sausage Provin­cial

In fact, you’ll note that the bis­cuits are dis­tinct­ly star-shaped. This is due to the only “bis­cuit cut­ter” that I had on hand was a star-shaped cook­ie cut­ter; but it worked. These bis­cuits are pret­ty hard to resist. Just between my wife and I, six-odd were gone before din­ner. We ate this with a 3rd revi­sion of a provin­cial dish that start­ed with chick­en, but had added sausage by this incar­na­tion. Sop­ping up gravy with cheese bis­cuits is divine. I’m not going to dis­cuss the provin­cial dish here — it was a slow cook­er exper­i­ment that wasn’t right at first, but the 3rd incar­na­tion of left­overs was the charm — so pret­ty much unre­peat­able. Also sur­pris­ing to me is that the bis­cuits have sur­vived sev­er­al days in a plas­tic bag — they’re still bet­ter heat­ed up or light­ly toast­ed in the toast­er-oven, but good nonethe­less.

 

Stand-Mix­er Cheese Bis­cuits
Print Recipe
These are basic bak­ing pow­der bis­cuits to be made with your Stand-Mix­er. With my cook­ie cut­ter, this made about 20 bis­cuits, but bis­cuit size will deter­mine the yield.
Serv­ings Prep Time
20 bis­cuits 20 min­utes
Cook Time
15 min­utes
Serv­ings Prep Time
20 bis­cuits 20 min­utes
Cook Time
15 min­utes
Stand-Mix­er Cheese Bis­cuits
Print Recipe
These are basic bak­ing pow­der bis­cuits to be made with your Stand-Mix­er. With my cook­ie cut­ter, this made about 20 bis­cuits, but bis­cuit size will deter­mine the yield.
Serv­ings Prep Time
20 bis­cuits 20 min­utes
Cook Time
15 min­utes
Serv­ings Prep Time
20 bis­cuits 20 min­utes
Cook Time
15 min­utes
Ingre­di­ents
Serv­ings: bis­cuits
Instruc­tions
Make the Dough:
  1. Dump flour, bak­ing pow­der, salt (if any) and but­ter in your stand-mix­er bowl. Attach the bowl and the flat beat­er to your stand-mix­er. Start with STIR speed and mix for about one minute.
  2. Scrape the bowl and the beat­er (prob­a­bly best if you stopped the stand-mix­er here — but it’s your adven­ture), Add the milk. Return or con­tin­ue STIR speed as you see fit.
  3. Do the Tim Tay­lor Grunt as the machine works to do your bid­ding. Also, add your cheese in near the end of this part. Mix until the dough starts to cling to the beat­er. If you over-mix here, you’re using up your bak­ing pow­der and you’ll get flat bis­cuits (if that hap­pens — now you know why). With great pow­er comes great respon­si­bil­i­ty — you only real­ly get to use speed STIR (1) here.
  4. (note to self: find a rea­son for speed 10)
  5. Spread some flour some­where. Pro tip: counter near the sink is a good choice if you have to clean the mess up your­self. Dump the dough onto your “poof” of flour.
  6. Grease a bak­ing sheet (or two, as need­ed).
Make lit­tle bits out fo the big bit:
  1. Do while (dough larg­er than cut­ter):
  2. Flat­ten dough with your hands. Some peo­ple use a rolling pin here, but we don’t have a rolling pin and there’s some­thing so vis­cer­al about pound­ing dough.
  3. Cut as many bis­cuits as you can. Extra points for cre­ative geom­e­try.
  4. Repeat.
  5. Flat­ten last bit as “chef’s dibs”
Bake!
  1. Arrange all your pro­to-bis­cuits onto your greased bak­ing tray(s). They don’t grow lat­er­al­ly hard­ly at all, so you can put a fair­ly large num­ber of them on a try — cer­tain­ly more that the accom­pa­ny­ing pic­tures. Option­al­ly (I didn’t) brush with but­ter. It’s pret­ty easy to but­ter them lat­er. Maybe this is com­pen­sa­tion for those that use short­en­ing? We don’t like com­pen­sa­tion; we like the real thing.
  2. Bake! 450F for 12 to 15 min­utes. For max­i­mum enjoy­ment, serve and eat imme­di­ate­ly!
    Fresh Cheese Biscuits
Recipe Notes

On the choice of cheese and salt: There is salt in most cheese.  With­out any cheese, you might add as much as 1/2 tsp of salt.  With ched­dar, I found 1/4 tsp to be tasty.  If your cheese is salti­er than ched­dar, you might not add salt.  You can also add more (or less) cheese.  Less cheese seems almost point­less.  I would assume that at some point, the bis­cuit fails struc­tur­al integri­ty due to cheese, but it still might be tasty.

What do you do if you don’t pos­sess a stand-mix­er?  I don’t know exact­ly.  I’m work­ing on how to use my fan­cy new stand-mix­er.  I gath­er you work much hard­er com­bin­ing the ingre­di­ents… but it’s not rock­et sci­ence.

Stand-Mixer Cheese Biscuits Cooling

Stand-Mix­er Cheese Bis­cuits Cool­ing

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